PurpleAir Blog

  • Community Spotlight: West Coast Calibration Factor Study

    Each time a PurpleAir sensor is installed, and air quality data is uploaded to the PurpleAir Map, the quality and reach of our community increases. In this post, we highlight the results from a scientific study and discuss what it means in the bigger picture. The network improves with each additional sensor, and studies like the one in this post are also part of the PurpleAir story.
  • Indoor vs Outdoor Air Quality – What’s the Difference?

    Since air is fluid, it can flow in and out of our homes, sometimes bringing pollutants with it. Thanks to the PurpleAir indoor and outdoor sensors, you can quickly compare air quality around you to make the best decision for your home or office. 
  • Fireworks Today – Can We Do Better?

    There's no doubt that large, night-sky-filled fireworks are dramatic and thrilling. From the immense splashes of colors streaking across the sky to the booms of massive explosions that send sparkles in all directions, fireworks have a unique place in people's hearts. For many, celebrations like 4th July just feel right if they're capped with dramatic fireworks that get the heart racing. But is that enough? Is the cost too high? Let's see if we can do better.
  • PurpleAir Study Showcase: PurpleAir Sensors Used in Environmental Disparity Study Across US

    This study references real-time PurpleAir sensors to examine how air quality impacts different communities differently. Specifically, the study compares regions characterized according to different ethnicities and races. 
  • Urban Trees That Help Reduce Air Pollution

    Since the industrial revolution, cities worldwide have undergone an extensive and neverending transformation. Creating more residential areas, bus...
  • Cooking and Cleaning Generate More Indoor Pollution Than You Think

    The World Health Organization stated that 3.8 million people die from exposure to pollution generated in their homes every year. It is impressive that indoor air is not receiving the necessary attention, considering that people spend 90% of their time inside. The most common indoor air pollution source is cooking, especially when roasting and frying. 

  • Outdoor Pollution: Carbon Monoxide

    CO or Carbon Monoxide is a colorless and oderless gas. If inhaled constantly or the concentrations are too high, it can affect our health severely. Vehicles and other machinery that burns fossil fuels represent the most significant sources of CO.
  • Air Quality Index Guide: What Should You Do In Each Level?

    Particle pollution is one of the most common pollutants, and often it is not clear what we can or should do in each air quality index level. There are six levels, from good to hazardous. 
  • Ultrasonic Humidifiers, a Source of PM2.5?

    Outdoor air quality is unpredictable. The weather and atmospheric conditions can change from one day to another. Environmental pollution, car density, and even daily activities like smoking and lighting fires can affect the outdoor PM2.5 concentrations. In a sense, indoor air should be easier to maintain clean and breathable. But what if there is a silent enemy inside your home?
  • Indoor AQI During Wildfires

    During an ongoing wildfire, the fire itself, the smoke and the ashes can affect your health. The outdoor air has higher than usual particulate matter concentrations and is unhealthy to breathe. This unhealthy air can also come inside houses and buildings, making the indoor air unhealthy to breathe too.
  • High Levels of PM2.5 in the Air

    When the AQI (Air Quality Index) in your area shows extremely high levels of PM2.5 or your PurpleAir sensor shows a health alert, it means that pollution is hazardous at these levels. Consider these steps to reduce your exposure.
  • What is Particulate Matter (PM)?

    PM - which stands for particulate matter or particle pollution - is an intricate mixture of liquid droplets made up of acids (like nitrates and sulfates), ammonium, water, black carbon, organic chemicals, metals, soil material, and air-borne particles.